rail grab


Holding the rail of the surfboard; used in any situation where a bit of extra stability is needed. California surfer John Peck made the rail grab famous in the winter of 1962–63, as he blasted through hollow sections at Hawaii's Pipeline in a low, three-point stance, riding backside, right hand locked on the edge of his board for balance. Tuberiding to this day, both frontside and backside, is often accompanied by a grabbed rail

Aerial surfing brought in a new and complicated set of rail grabs: one-handed, two-handed, near the nose, between the legs, behind the legs—the variations are tweaked endlessly.

Gouging high-speed midface turns can also be helped and guided by a one-handed rail grab.