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Smiling power surfer from Oahu, Hawaii; the sport’s most successful pro during the early and mid-’70s, and cofounder of Quiksilver USA. Hakman was born (1948) in Redondo Beach, in southwest Los Angeles County, the son of an aeronautical engineer, and raised in nearby Palos Verdes. His early years in the sport were marked by a dazzling combination of talent and good fortune: his surfing father bought him a beautiful new 7′ 11&... Read More
Harbor town located at the western end of the North Shore of Oahu, Hawaii, fronted by an excellent but temperamental right-breaking wave. Haleiwa is best during winter, and requires a west swell. From three to eight feet it’s a lively, hollow high-performance wave. At 10 to 15 feet it’s a thrilling but punishing semi-beast that invariably winds down to a closeout finale in what is called the “toilet bowl.” An eastbound ... Read More
Charismatic regularfooter from Seal Beach, California; winner of the first West Coast Surfing Championships, held at the Huntington Beach Pier in 1959, described by the Orange County Register as a “larger-than-life figure who always brought the party with him.” Haley was born (1935) and raised in Seal Beach, and began riding wave in the late ’40s on a rubber mat. He later gravitated to Huntington Beach, where he became... Read More
Small, shy, whisper-voiced regularfooter from Honolulu, Hawaii; runner-up in the 1966 World Surfing Championships, and remembered for her subtle but beautiful technique. Hamasaki was born (1946) and raised in Honolulu, and began surfing at age 10 in Waikiki. In 1963 she moved to Dana Point, California, where she lived for 10 years. Had it not been for Capistrano Beach surfer and two-time world champion Joyce Hoffman, Hamasaki would have... Read More
Beatific amateur champion who, at age 13, lost her left arm to a tiger shark while surfing near her home in Kauai. Hamilton (no relation to Bill or Laird Hamilton) was born (1990) and raised in Kauai, began surfing at age four, and was soon dominating the local amateur circuit. In May 2003 she won the women’s division of a state-wide event in Honolulu, beating a field of mostly older competitors, at which point the thin blond goofyfooter... Read More
Fluid regularfooter from Hanalei, Kauai; regarded by many as surfing’s definitive stylist from the mid-1960s to the mid-’70s; father of big-wave rider Laird Hamilton. Bill Hamilton was born (1948) in Long Beach, California, the son of a former big-band orchestra leader father and a commercial artist mother. He was raised in Laguna Beach, began surfing at age 11, and at 15 was invited to join the prestigious Windansea Surf Club.... Read More
Brawny blond regularfooter from Maui, Hawaii; a unanimous choice as the best big-wave rider of the 1990s and early ’00s, and one of the four or five surfers throughout the sport’s history to significantly change the manner in which waves are ridden. Hamilton was born (1964) in San Francisco, California, the son of surfing parents. Laird is Scottish for “lord.” His father left the family and joined the Merchant Ma... Read More
Type of noseride where the surfer, having already walked the board, moves the leading foot forward until the toes hang off the tip; not impossible on a shortboard, but mostly a longboard maneuver. Hanging five is the first on-the-tip noseride mastered by the intermediate longboarder; the rider’s stance usually stays in line with the board’s stringer, and the weight is mostly on the back foot—about 18 inches behind the fron... Read More
A hotdogging longboard-only variation on the noseride, usually performed after hanging ten, where the surfer does a quick half-turn and drapes one or both heels off the tip of the board while riding backwards. Extremely difficult and sometimes dismissed as showy by longboard purists. First performed in the mid-’60s. Gary Propper of Florida, along with California’s Dru Harrison, were two early masters of hanging heels. Also called... Read More
Longboarding maneuver during which the rider hangs all 10 toes off the front end of the surfboard—the most celebrated form of noseriding. “Getting ten,” Florida surf journalist Jim MacLaren wrote in 1995, “separates the good noseriders from everybody else.” Surfers generally prepare to hang ten by trimming the board across the wave face and cross-stepping to the front. One of the sport’s most difficult an... Read More
Surfboard shaper and manufacturer from San Diego County, California; founder of Hansen Surfboards, and a leader of the signature model era in the mid-1960s. Hansen was born (1937) and raised in South Dakota, lettered in boxing, track, and football, and earned up to $600 a week as a mink trapper. He began surfing at age 18, after graduating high school and hitchhiking to San Diego. In 1958, while stationed at Fort Ord army base, Hansen b... Read More
Enduring, understated board manufacturer from Seal Beach, California. Harbour was born (1943) and raised in Seal Beach, the son of a Douglas Aircraft machinist. On his 16th birthday, after riding a surf mat through his early teen years, Harbour got a surfboard. Two months later the board was stolen, and Harbour, broke, built one from scratch. In 1962, after making and selling dozens of boards out of the family garage, Harbour drop... Read More
Steely Australian pro surfer from Narrabeen, New South Wales; world champion in 1987 and 1991; described by fellow Australian title-holder Pam Burridge as “the Iceman, [and] the world’s toughest competitor.” Hardman was born (1966) in Sydney, the son of financier Brian Hardman, who later became the world pro tour’s media director. He was raised in the beachfront suburb of Warriewood, began surfing at age 10, and moved ... Read More
Wiry regularfoot surfer from Tahiti; a perennial national and French champion in the 1970s and ’80s, and a first-rate tuberider described by surf writer Steve Hawk in 1995 as “a man of integrity . . . the Gerry Lopez of Tahiti.” Harehoe was born (1959) and raised in Papeete, the son of an electrician father and school teacher mother, and began surfing in 1971; two years later he won the first of 15 Tahitian national t... Read More
Unheralded big-wave rider of the 1960s, originally from Manhattan Beach, California. “He doesn’t care for beach discussions and all the trimmings,” Petersen’s Surfing magazine said of Harlow in 1965. “But ask any well-known surfer in Hawaii, and they’ll tell you that Warren is one of the best.” Harlow began surfing in 1947 as a junior high school student on a 50-pound hollow board. He m... Read More
Terrier-built regularfooter from Hermosa Beach, California; winner of the 1966 Swami’s Pro-Am, and runner-up in the 1969 US Championships. “Dru was a charismatic, soulful, radical surfer,” fellow South Bay wave-rider and frequent foil Mike Purpus said. “He wasn’t much over five feet tall, but he was tough as hell and never backed down.” Harrison was born [1950] in Hawthorne, the son of a cement truck ... Read More
Hot-rodding California surfer in the 1930s and ’40s, and pioneering geriatric surfer in the ’80s and ’90s. Harrison was born (1913) in Garden Grove, south of Los Angeles, and as a child traveled to and from the family summer house in Laguna Beach by horse and wagon. He began surfing in 1925 at age 12, and eight years later was among the first to ride San Onofre; in 1933 he won the Pacific Coast Surf Riding Championships.... Read More
Well-traveled Australian surfer and boardmaker from Queensland’s Gold Coast; winner of the 1973 Australian National Titles. Harvey was born (1948) in Sydney, and began riding waves at age 10, not long after his family moved to Avalon Beach. A smooth, stylish goofyfooter, fond of long back-arching trim lines, Harvey finished 3rd in the 1969 Australian Titles, held at Margaret River, behind winner Nat Young and runner-up Peter Drou... Read More
Club organizer and surf society raconteur from La Jolla, California; founder of the Windansea Surf Club in 1963. Hasley was born (1934) in Oklahoma, moved with his family in 1941 to Seal Beach, California, and began surfing at age 10. He moved to La Jolla in 1958, one year after receiving a master’s in education from Long Beach State College. He briefly worked as a basketball coach at Santa Ana High School. In 1963, Hasley picked ... Read More
Weekly one-hour CBS-TV police drama series, filmed on location in Hawaii, starring Jack Lord as the steely-eyed and taciturn detective Steve McGarrett. Hawaii Five-O ran from 1968 to 1980, making it television’s longest-running police show at the time. Surfing rarely figured into Hawaii Five-O, but surfers often tuned in to catch the title shot of a huge, empty, churning wave, famously set to a brass-heavy theme song re... Read More
World’s largest surfboard and memerobilia auction, held biennially in Honolulu from 2001 to 2011; founded by longtime contest organizer Randy Rarick. Over its first decade of existence, the Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction sold more than $3 million worth of boards and assorted surf world collectibles. The event featured both a live and a silent auction, with dozens of grey-haired, aloha-shirted surf world luminaries on hand; in l... Read More
Ninety-five-page book written by Tom Blake, part surf history and part instruction manual, originally published in 1935 as Hawaiian Surfboard; described by The Surfer’s Journal as a “seminal volume of surf literature, [and] the sport’s single most important document.” Surfing articles, essays, and journal entries were published before Blake’s book, and in 1931 California’s Ron Drummo... Read More
Rugged regularfooter originally from Orange County, California; a standout power surfer of the early and mid-1970s. Hawk was born (1950) in South Gate, and began surfing at age 14 in Huntington Beach; along with brothers Tom and Chris, he was soon regarded as one of the area’s top riders. In 1967, Hawk moved to the North Shore of Oahu and found that the big Hawaiian waves perfectly matched his aggressive but fluid approach. By 1971 he wa... Read More
Lanky quick-witted surf journalist from San Diego, California; Surfer magazine editor from 1990 to 1998, and a Contributing Editor since 2004. Hawk was born (1955) in Pensacola, Florida, raised in San Diego, and began surfing at age 14. Not long after earning a B.A. in English from U.C. Santa Barbara, Hawk took the first of a series of newspaper reporter jobs in north San Diego County, leading to full-time work with the Orange Cou... Read More
Eye-catching surfer from Costa Mesa, California; winner of the Pacific Coast Women’s Surfboard Championships in 1938, 1939, and 1940. Hawkins had “the figure and looks of a movie star,” surf journalist Jeff Duclos wrote in 1999, and was “grace personified in the water.” Hawkins was born (1919) and raised in Pasadena, began swimming at age nine, and at 17 was the Amateur Athletic Union 500-meter freestyle champion.... Read More
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