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Temperamental right-breaking reef wave located on the south shore of Maui, Hawaii, adjacent to a boat harbor; renowned as the world’s fastest ridable surf break. Although Maalaea breaks with machinelike perfect form, less than one in four rides here are completed; for most surfers, the object at Maalaea is to simply hold trim position inside the tube for as long as possible. “It’s just pure, unadulterated speed,” Maui... Read More
Even-tempered Australian pro surfer from Cowaramup Bay, Western Australia; world-ranked #3 in 1989 and 1993; best remembered as an evangelical Christian, and a deadly efficient small-wave rider. MacAulay was born (1963) and raised in Perth, began surfing at age nine, and was one of the country’s best amateurs in the early and mid-’80s, winning the state championships in 1982 and 1983, and finishing runner-up in the National Titles ... Read More
Well-muscled regularfoot pro surfer from Tomakin, New South Wales, Australia; #5 on the 2005 world tour’s final rankings; described by Surfer magazine that year as “a lead-footed power surfer . . . and one of the most dangerous draws on Tour.” MacDonald was born (1979) in Canberra, and raised in the small beachfront town of Tomakin, where, along with twin brother Anthony, be began surfing as a schoolboy. Phil... Read More
Fastidious, detail-obsessed filmmaker from Laguna Beach, California, a two-time Academy Award nominee, best known to surfers as the co-creator of 1972’s Five Summer Stories. MacGillivray was born (1945) in San Diego, California, the son of a navy officer and former lifeguard, and raised in Orange County’s Corona del Mar. He began surfing at 13, and started making short surf films in high school, which he screened in his ga... Read More
Laconic goofyfooter from Cardiff, California; world-ranked #2 in 1995, and generally regarded as the smoothest-riding surfer of his generation. Machado was born (1973) in Sydney, Australia, the son of an American general contractor/real estate agent father and a British school teacher mother, and began surfing at age nine, five years after his family moved to Cardiff. He put together a string of good results in the U.S. Surfing Championships, ... Read More
Good-natured Jorge Machuca of Puerto Rico first came to the attention of the surfing world in 1967 at the age of 14 when he finished runner-up in the Puerto Rico International, behind reigning U.S. champion Corky Carroll, but ahead of American surf heroes like Rusty Miller, Claude Codgen, Gary Propper, and Dewey Weber. Flexible and creative in the water, a first-rate switchfooter, Machuca was touted as a real threat to win the 1968 worl... Read More
Hot-tempered Australian pro surfer from Maroubra, Sydney, world-ranked #3 in 1994, and noted as the only female pro tour surfer ever suspended for fighting. MacKenzie was born (1974) and raised in the beachfront suburb of Maroubra, began surfing at age 10, and quickly developed a low, driving, athletic wave-riding style. In 1992 MacKenzie won both the Australian National Titles and the amateur World Surfing Championships, and was named ... Read More
History-rich surf break located on the arid west side of Oahu, 30 miles northwest of Honolulu; often described as the birthplace of big-wave surfing; home to the 1954-founded Makaha International Surfing Championships, the world’s first international surf competition. Bordered by steep lava- ridged valleys and mountains to the east, Makaha (Hawaiian for “fierce”) is one of the state’s most consistent and variegat... Read More
Annual surfing competition held at Makaha on the west side of Oahu, Hawaii, from 1954 to 1971, usually in November or December; regarded in the late ’50s and early ’60s as the unofficial world championships. Created by Honolulu surfer and restaurant supplier John Lind, and sponsored by the Waianae Lions Club as well as the Lind-founded Waikiki Surf Club, the inaugural Makaha event was a bust: the wave-riding events were canc... Read More
Easygoing photographer from Honolulu, Hawaii, who shot many of the best-known surfing images of Waikiki and Makaha in the 1950s and early ’60s. Maki was born (1924) in Kilauea, Kauai, raised in Honolulu, began surfing in 1944, and taught himself how to use a camera. His photos (always black and white; developed from his home darkroom) were first published in 1953 in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin and the Honolulu Advertiser... Read More
Definitive California pointbreak, often described as the “original perfect wave,” located on the northern arm of Santa Monica Bay in Los Angeles County; a surf-culture hothouse, and the center for much of the advancement in surfing performance and board design from the mid-40s to the mid-60s. “Malibu,” surf journalist Paul Gross wrote, “is the exact spot on earth where ancient surfing became modern surfing.”... Read More
Annual surfing contest held in early fall, from 1962 to 1968; regarded as the second-biggest event on the West Coast competition calendar following the United States Surfing Championships. The Malibu Invitational was conceived and developed by the Malibu Surfing Association, a local club, and co-sponsored by the Malibu Chamber of Commerce. Scores were kept for both team and individual entrants. Four five-man clubs competed on October 20... Read More
Short-lived 1967 ABC-TV prime-time musical variety show, hosted by former teen idol and Ozzie and Harriet star Ricky Nelson. Malibu U was shot on a private beach north of Malibu Pier. After the opening titles and theme song (“All the students report to the dean of the school/He will tell you to work just as hard as you can/Getting a tan/At Malibu U”), Nelson made his entrance, dressed in trunks and a surfer T-shirt, intro... Read More
Hot-tempered manager from Sydney, Australia; the first such full-time representative in the sport, employed by more than a dozen top pros in the 1980s and early ’90s, including world champions Tom Carroll and Martin Potter. Mansted was 25 in 1982, and the sole employee of the ambitiously named Mansted Management Company, when he signed young Australian pro Tom Carroll as his first client. For 10 percent of Carroll’s earnings (spons... Read More
Witty, eccentric surf writer and editor from northern California; Surfer magazine staffer from 1988-1998, and a prolific author of surf-themed books. Marcus was born (1960) in San Francisco, moved to Santa Clara Valley as a toddler, then headed west to Santa Cruz with his family at age 10, where he learned to surf. After high school, Marcus sold hot dogs out of a VW bus on Santa Cruz beaches, enrolled in and dropped out of several col... Read More
Smiling, rubber-limbed surfer from northern New South Wales, cited by Australia’s Surfing Life magazine in 1998 as “the best free-surfer in the world.” Margieson was born (1972) in Sydney, but raised in the bucolic wave-rich environs of Byron Bay, 60 miles south of the Queensland/New South Wales border. Margieson developed a wave-riding style that was as smooth and fluid as it was explosive. He had a spectac... Read More
Good-natured pro surfer from Cronulla, New South Wales, Australia; world-ranked #8 in 1992. “‘Dog’ is his nickname, and dog is his nature,” Surfer said of Marsh in 1991. “Nice, warm, happy, honest, faithful. Also tough and dangerous.” Marsh was born (1967) and raised in Cronulla, the son of a tow truck driver, and began surfing at age nine. In 1986 he won the Australian National Titles and was runner-... Read More
Quiet and persevering Southern California surfboard shaper, credited with making roughly 1,200 boards every year between 1963 and 2012. Martin was born (1937) and raised in San Diego County, California, began surfing at age 12, and shaped his first board—a balsa/ redwood laminate—that same year. He spent most of his long career working for Hobie Surfboards and Stewart Surfboards, and has made boards for David Nuuhiwa, Bill Hamilton, Gerry ... Read More
Immensely talented pro surfer from Santa Barbara, California; world-ranked #5 in 2006; the first Mexican-American to qualify for the pro tour; known as much for his colorful anti-surf industry rants as for his powerful, stylish turns. “He’s gotten where he is with blue-collar values,” surf writer Brad Melekian said in 2007. “Honesty, humility, hard work. He’s not at all a believer in bullshit—his own or anyone... Read More
Barrel-chested regularfoot surfer from Long Beach, California; winner of the 1965 United States Surfing Championships, and globetrotting lead in a series of surf movies made by Greg MacGillivray and Jim Freeman in the mid- and late ’60s. Martinson was born (1947) and raised in Long Beach, the son of a mechanic and stock-car racer father, and began surfing at age 10. Six years later he placed runner-up in the 1962 West Coast Champi... Read More
Physics-bending pro freesurfer from Lahaina, Maui; regarded as one of the sport’s greatest natural talents; diagnosed at age 17 with Asperger’s Syndrome. “He’s one of the best surfers in the world right now,” former world champion Mark Occhilupo said of Marzo in 2008, “and for sure the most futuristic.” Marzo was born (1989) in San Diego, California, and moved with his family to Lahaina as a todd... Read More
San Francisco–based surfer/lawyer/environmentalist. Massara was born (1961) in Santa Barbara, California, began surfing at age 10, and graduated in 1987 from the University of San Francisco Law School. He began his most famous crusade just one year later, when he drove to northern California’s Humboldt Bay to ride some waves and sniff out—literally—an ongoing toxic runoff problem with two local lumber-pulp mills, Simpson Paper and... Read More
Regularfoot surfer from Daytona Beach, Florida; a big-wave revivalist in the early 1980s, and very nearly the first world pro tour fatality, after a head injury in the 1983 Pipeline Masters. Massfeller was born (1955) and raised in Daytona Beach, began surfing at age nine, and moved to the North Shore of Oahu not long after graduating from high school. In 1978, he and fellow Floridian Pat Mulhern were the surprise winners in the World Team Cha... Read More
Type of surfing performed on a soft, inflatable, rectangular surf mat; wildly popular in the 1960s and early ’70s with weekend beachgoers as well as preteen surfers-in-training. The all-rubber “surf-o-plane” was invented by a Sydney physician in 1934, and American-made surf mats—also called “surf rafts” or “floats”—were being used in Virginia Beach in the early ’40s and in Southern California... Read More
Fearsome big-wave break located just west of the Pillar Point headland in Half Moon Bay, California, 25 miles south of San Francisco; the heavily publicized focal point for West Coast big-wave riding since the early ’90s. “I felt like I was seeing things I shouldn’t have,” local Don Curry said, recalling a heavy day at Maverick’s. “It felt like God and the devil were right there, and it could go either way.&... Read More
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