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Shadowy, business-savvy surfer and entrepreneur; founder of Ron Jon Surf Shop, a chain that includes a Cocoa Beach, Florida, flagship store long recognized as the sport’s largest and gaudiest retail outlet. Ron DiMenna has for decade’s been one of surfing’s most private and mysterious figures, and little is know about his early life. He was born around 1937, grew up in Manahawkin, New Jersey, the son of a grocer, and a... Read More
While sexism and homophobia have long been surf culture hallmarks, the sport for the most part has been ahead of the social curve on racism. San Diego-raised surf photographer Aaron Chang, for example, said he was treated “viciously” in the schoolyard during the early 1970s for being Asian, and said surfing became the most important thing in his life in large part because “there was no racism in the water, just ability.R... Read More
Holding the rail of the surfboard; used in any situation where a bit of extra stability is needed. California surfer John Peck made the rail grab famous in the winter of 1962–63, as he blasted through hollow sections at Hawaii’s Pipeline in a low, three-point stance, riding backside, right hand locked on the edge of his board for balance. Tuberiding to this day, both frontside and backside, is often accompanied by a grabbed rail ... Read More
Dreaded variation of wipeout in which a rider’s board tilts sideways and flies up between the legs into the genitals. Rare, but painful. ... Read More
Authoritative surf traveler/organizer/boardmaker from Sunset Beach, Hawaii; semifinalist in the 1970 World Surfing Championships; executive director of the Triple Crown of Surfing from its 1983 inception until 2012. Rarick was born (1949) in Seattle, Washington, moved with his family to Honolulu at age five, and began surfing at 10, under the tutelage of fabled beachboy Rabbit Kekai. He won the juniors division of the 1967 state surfing champi... Read More
Hard-charging, rock-and-rolling goofyfooter from Westhampton, New York; winner of the 1974 United States Surfing Championships. Rasmussen was born in 1955, the son of an aerospace test pilot and former pro basketball player, raised in Maine, and began surfing at age 10, not long after his family moved to an affluent Westhampton neighborhood. As a juniors division surfer Rasmussen placed fourth in the 1972 U.S. Championships, first in th... Read More
Unassuming big-wave rider from Torquay, Victoria, Australia, described by surf journalist Steve Hawk as the “Forrest Gump of giant waves”; world-ranked #11 in 1992, and runner-up in the 1999 and 2002 editions of the Quiksilver in Memory of Eddie Aikau contest at Waimea Bay. Ray was born (1965) in Torquay, moved with his family to Coolangatta, Queensland, in 1970, and began surfing at age seven. In 1983—five years after mov... Read More
Australian pro surfer and surf businessman from Sydney’s Bondi Beach; world-ranked #16 in 1977, and the managing director for Quiksilver International surfwear from 1979 to 2008. “He has that dark-eyed sinister air about him that appeals to women and makes men wonder,” surf journalist Phil Jarratt said of Raymond in 1977. “He would have made a good con man, hustler or gigolo.” Raymond was born (1954) in Wa... Read More
Plain-spoken pro surfer from Busselton, Western Australia; world-ranked #2 in 2001 and 2006. Redman-Carr was born (1975) and raised in Busselton, and began surfing at age 10. Raised on the punishing reef surf of the Margaret River area, the slender regularfooter (5′ 7″, 127 pounds) performed best when conditions got big and powerful; she was the first woman to regularly surf the notoriously shallow waves at the Box, not far from ... Read More
A foaming whitewater wave that first moves into deep water, so that it reverts back to an unbroken swell—or the whitewater is reduced to a fringe along the crest—then onto a shallow area where the wave once again steepens and breaks. Reforms come in all sizes and shapes. Waves at Second Reef Pipeline in Hawaii will reform into a gaping tube on the nearshore reef; waves at Huntington Beach, California, usually reform into a boring sh... Read More
American surfing pioneer from New Jersey; the first person, along with Tom Blake, to ride Malibu. Reid was seven years old in 1912 when Hawaii’s Duke Kahanamoku gave a surfing demonstration in Atlantic City, near Reid’s home; the following day Reid began riding waves on his mother’s ironing board. Reid traveled to California at age 19 and became a lifeguard at the Santa Monica Swimming Club. In 1925, he made the first ... Read More
Religion played a significant role in the surfing lives of ancient Polynesians: tree trunks were prayed over before they were shaped into surfboards, surf-dedicated temples were built (suggesting that there was a god unique to surfing, although the deity’s name remains unknown), waves were called forth with chants and prayers, and competing surfers always made offerings prior to entering the water. Calvinist Christianity trumped n... Read More
Concert venue and dance hall in Newport Beach, California; launching pad for surf music innovator Dick Dale, and point of origin for the no-finesse-required “surfer stomp” dance step. The block-long two-story beachfront Rendezvous Ballroom, located just west of Balboa Pier, opened in 1928, and quickly became known as the “West Coast Home of the Big Band Sound,” featuring acts like Artie Shaw, Tommy Dorsey, Gene Krupa, a... Read More
Hyperkinetic switchfooter from the San Fernando Valley, northeast of Los Angeles. A 1968 issue of Surfing magazine noted that the 15-year-old Reno “surfs like a young Dewey Weber, always on the go, climbing and dropping, and driving hard on every move.” Reno was the surprise winner of the Malibu Club Invitational competition that year, and was featured in three of the most popular surf films of the early ’70s: P... Read More
Trendsetting, worship-inspiring pro surfer from Ventura, California; world-ranked #4 in 2010, but best known as an anti-establishment freesurfing genius. “Whatever Dane Reynolds does, says and thinks”, said Stab magazine in 2010, “will direct surfing into the future.” Reynolds was born (1985) in Long Beach, California, moved with his family to Ventura when he was 10, began surfing shortly thereafter, and... Read More
Flyweight Brazilian goofyfooter from Rio de Janeiro, world-ranked #3 in 1999, making him the highest-ranked Brazilian in the history of world tour pro surfing at the time. Ribas was born (1971) and raised in Cabofria, Brazil, began surfing at age 10, and turned pro in 1990. He was a small-wave dynamo—due in part to his spring-loaded build; at 5′ 4″, 125 pounds, Ribas was the smallest male surfer on tour—and thus struck fear int... Read More
Regularfoot surfer from Oceanside, California; fourth-place finisher in the 1964 World Surfing Championships. LJ (Little John) Richards was born (1939) and raised in Oceanside and began surfing at age 13, often riding with schoolmate and mentor Phil Edwards. In 1963 he won the West Coast Surfing Championships and the following year placed runner-up in the United States Invitational. Richards was invited to Sydney, Australia, for the fir... Read More
Pro surfer from Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia; electrifying in the water, mannerly and easygoing on land; the first person to win four consecutive world championships (1979-82); described by Australia’s Surfing Life magazine as the country’s “surfing saint.” Richards was born (1957) and raised in Newcastle, an industrial city located 100 miles north of Sydney. Ray Richards, Mark’s father, ... Read More
Easygoing vegetarian goofyfoot pro surfer from Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia; winner of the 1980 Australian National Titles, and world-ranked #7 in 1982. Richardson was born (1956) and raised in Wollongong. A chronic late bloomer, he didn’t begin surfing until age 15, didn’t turn pro until 25, and posted his biggest win—at the 1997 Oxbow Masters, a contest for retired world tour pros—at 40. Richardson later attr... Read More
Good-looking, media-savvy regularfoot surfer from Santa Monica, California; a dominating presence at Malibu from the late ’60s to the late ’80s; cofounder in 1967 of Natural Progression Surfboards. The summer of 1970 was a high point in J Riddle’s surfing life, as the 20-year-old was simultaneously on the covers of Surfer and Surfing magazines, and starred in Cosmic Children, Hal Jepsen’s firs... Read More
Frothy and lightly sermonizing 1964 Columbia Pictures movie about three California surfers visiting Oahu’s North Shore in search of big-wave thrills and tropical romance. Jody Wallis, Steamer Lane, and Chase Colton (Fabian, Tab Hunter, and Peter Brown, respectively) find plenty of surf, and Jody wins the climactic big-wave showdown at Waimea Bay, but each comes to realize that full-time surfing just isn’t compatible with responsibl... Read More
Big-wave surfing documentary made by Los Angeles filmmaker Stacy Peralta; released by Sony Pictures in 2004 to critical acclaim and medium-strong ticket sales. Peralta—a top pro skateboarder in the 1970s, cofounder of the Powell-Peralta skateboard company, and a longtime surfer—made a splashy entry into general audience filmmaking with 2001’s Dogtown and Z-Boys, a documentary about the rise and fall of the Santa Monic... Read More
Bright and mischievous surf journalist, originally from Perth, Western Australia; co-founder of Stab magazine in 2004; editor of Australia’s Surfing Life (ASL) magazine from 1995 to 1999. Rielly was born (1967) in Perth and raised in the nearby suburb of Willetton, the son of a pro wrestler father and a diplomat mother, and began surfing at age 12. After working as a blackjack dealer and a barman, Riell... Read More
A wave that breaks to the right, from the surfer’s shoreward-facing vantage point. As viewed from the beach, a surfer on a right moves from right to left. Malibu, Kirra, Jeffreys Bay, and Waimea Bay are famous right-breaking waves. ... Read More
Long, elegant right-breaking point wave located on the border between Ventura and Santa Barbara counties; nicknamed “Queen of the Coast,” and regarded as America’s gold-standard pointbreak. “At times the wave is so close to perfection,” surf journalist Bill Cleary wrote of Rincon del Mar (Little Corner of the Sea) in 1966, “that maneuvering—nose rides, turning and cutbacks—seems inappropriate, an insult ... Read More
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