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Bright, impulsive, well-traveled surfer and writer from Cocoa Beach, Florida, who once described the sport as “three-dimensional free verse.” Valluzzi was born in 1948 and began surfing at age 14; in 1966 he was the men’s division runner-up in the East Coast Surfing Championships and competed in the World Championships; in 1967 he competed in the Duke Kahanamoku Invitational in Hawaii. Valluzzi published his first sur... Read More
Gifted but self-destructive surfer from La Jolla, California, known as “Mr. Pipeline” for his breakthrough performances at Hawaii’s most famous surf spot in the early and mid-1960s. Van Artsdalen was born (1941) in Norfolk, Virginia, the son of a career Navy man, and moved often as a child, until his family settled Pacific Beach, San Diego, when Van Artsdalen was 14. He became surfing a year later. A broad-shouldered natural ... Read More
Bright, friendly, outspoken big-wave rider from Haleiwa, Hawaii; one of the first surfers, in the mid-’50s, to move permanently from California to the North Shore. Van Dyke was born (1929) in San Francisco, California, the son of a dentist, and learned to bodysurf as a teenager along the San Francisco-area beaches, but didn’t ride stand-up until 1950, at age 20. He earned a double major B.A. in creative writing and physical educat... Read More
Candid regularfoot surfer from Santa Cruz, California; best known as the author of a controversial 1965 Surfer magazine article “Big Wave Danger: A Hoax!” and for his dramatic, arms-out, drop-knee turns. Peter Van Dyke, younger brother of big-wave surfing pioneer Fred Van Dyke, was born in San Francisco (1936), and began surfing at age 14 in Santa Cruz. The cutback move for which he came to be known was developed in... Read More
Illustrator and graphic designer from Los Angeles, California, best known to surfers as the creator of the Day-Glo poster for Bruce Brown’s 1966 crossover hit movie The Endless Summer. Van Hamersveld was born (1941) in Baltimore, Maryland, and moved with his family to Palos Verdes, in southwest Los Angeles County, when he was nine, and began surfing during middle school. While a student at Art Center College of Design ... Read More
Understated Australian surfboard shaper from Queensland’s Gold Coast; best known for the sleek single-fin boards he made throughout the 1970s, designed mostly for the high-speed pointbreak waves found at nearby Burleigh Heads and Kirra Point. Van Straalen was born (1944) and raised in The Hague, Netherlands, began surfing not long after moving with his family to the Sydney suburb of Avalon in 1951, and six years later began shaping board... Read More
Convex surfboard bottom design that bisects the rear and/or middle area of the board into two longitudinal panels; introduced by Australian boardmaker Bob McTavish in 1967. Vee makes turning easier, as the board wants to lean over on one panel or the other. Flat- or concave-bottom boards, however, are faster. While vee itself is a design feature, the “vee-bottom board” refers to a design McTavish came up with in 1967: a wid... Read More
Dashingly handsome goofyfoot surfer from Lima, Peru; national champion in 1967. Velarde was born (1941) and raised in Lima, the son of a wealthy fishmeal-producing family, and began surfing in 1956. He proved to be not only a gifted rider in big and small waves, but a born entertainer, able to dazzle onlookers by gripping the rails of his surfboard and pressing up into a perfect toes-pointed handstand. Friendly and bright—a graduate o... Read More
Swaggering, innovative surfboard designer, builder, and retailer from Hermosa Beach, California, best known for creating the “pig” in 1955, a wide-hipped board that became a prototype for today’s longboard. “Dale could out-drink, out-shoot, out-ride, out-shape, out-sell and out-finesse all comers,” Surfer’s Journal wrote in 1994. “And he made it all up as he went along.” Velzy wa... Read More
Feisty high-performance wave located at the far east end of the North Shore of Oahu in Hawaii; a two-way break, but generally known as a right. Velzyland needs a medium-small west swell, and breaks best from three to five foot. Bigger waves fold over on an outer reef, roll shoreward, and sometimes reform just prior to hitting the Velzyland proper. The rights wedge up into perfectly formed tubes, and often throw out two or three times on the sa... Read More
Durable surf band from Tacoma, Washington; formed in 1959 by guitarists Bob Bogle and Don Wilson and described by Rolling Stone as the “first, best, most lasting, and influential of instrumental guitar-based rock combos.” The original Ventures’ demo, a twangy pre-surf-sound cover of jazz guitarist Johnny Smith’s “Walk Don’t Run,” was a #2 hit in 1960, and was followed by a string of hot-selli... Read More
Surfing has justly been described as meditative, even spiritual, but it also has a violent streak that goes back to the sport’s very origins. Hawaiian legend tells of a handsome surfer at Waikiki who was nearly executed after riding the same wave as a high-ranking chieftess. In another incident, a prince whose board glanced off another rider during a surfing competition was later eviscerated on a stone alter as punishment. Surfing... Read More
Hard-charging, hard-partying surfer from Santa Cruz, California; winner of the Maverick’s big-wave contest in 1999, 2000 and 2004. “Flea’s psycho,” Hawaiian big-wave surfer  Brock Little said in 2000. “He’s not scared of anything. He’s going for it when eveybody else is pulling back.” Virostko was born (1971) and raised in Santa Cruz, the son of a landscaper father and a nurse-Jazzercize... Read More

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